Age-Stratified Profiles of Serum IL-6, IL-10, and TNF- a Cytokines among Kenyan Children with Schistosoma haematobium , Plasmodium falciparum , and Other Chronic Parasitic Co-infections

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dc.contributor.author Bustinduy, Amaya L
dc.contributor.author Sutherland, Laura L.
dc.contributor.author Chang-Cojulun, Alicia
dc.contributor.author Malhotra, Indu
dc.contributor.author DuVall, Adam S
dc.contributor.author Fairley, Jessica K
dc.contributor.author Mungai, Peter L.
dc.contributor.author Muchiri, Eric M.
dc.contributor.author Mutuku, Francis M
dc.contributor.author Kitron, Uriel
dc.contributor.author King, Charles H
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-06T10:11:52Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-06T10:11:52Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7969
dc.description.abstract In a study of children having polyparasitic infections in aSchistosoma haematobium– endemic area, we examined the hypothesis that S. haematobium–positive children, compared with S. haematobium–negative children (anti-soluble worm antigen preparation [SWAP] negative and egg negative) have increased systemic production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-a) and decreased down-regulatory IL-10. A total of 804 children, 2–19 years of age, were surveyed between July and December 2009 and tested for S. haematobium, Plasmodium falciparum, filariasis, and soil-transmitted helminth infections. Plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-a, and IL-10 were compared for S. haematobium–positive and S. haematobium–negative children, adjusting for malaria, filaria, and hookworm co infections, and for nutritional status, age group, sex, and geographic location. IL-10 was significantly elevated among children infected with S. haematobium, showing bimodal peaks in 7–8 and 13–14 years age groups. IL-10 was also higher among children who were acutely malnourished, whereas IL-10 levels were lower in the presence of S. haematobium–filaria co-infection. After adjustment for co-factors, IL-6 was significantly elevated among children of 5–6 years and among those with P. falciparum infection. Lower levels of IL-6 were found in malaria–hookworm co-infection. High levels of TNF- a were found in children aged 11–12 years regardless of infection status. In addition, village of residence was a strong predictor of IL-6 and IL-10 plasma levels. In adolescent children infected with S. haematobium, there is an associated elevation in circulating IL-10 that may reduce the risk of later morbidity. Although we did not find a direct link between S. haematobium infection and circulating pro-inflammatory IL-6 and TNF-a levels, future T-cell stimulation studies may provide more conclusive linkages between infection and cytokine responses in settings that are endemic for multiple parasites and multiple co-infections. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MOMBASA en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene en_US
dc.subject polyparasitic infections,Schistosoma haematobium,Kenyan Children en_US
dc.title Age-Stratified Profiles of Serum IL-6, IL-10, and TNF- a Cytokines among Kenyan Children with Schistosoma haematobium , Plasmodium falciparum , and Other Chronic Parasitic Co-infections en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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