Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWaggoner, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorBrichard, Julie
dc.contributor.authorMutuku, Francis
dc.contributor.authorNdenga, Bryson
dc.contributor.authorHeath, Claire Jane
dc.contributor.authorMohamed-Hadley, Alisha
dc.contributor.authorSahoo, Malaya K
dc.contributor.authorVulule, John
dc.contributor.authorLefterova, Martina
dc.contributor.authorBanaei, Niaz
dc.contributor.authorMukoko, Dunstan
dc.contributor.authorPinsky, Benjamin A
dc.contributor.authorLaBeaud, A. Desiree
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-03T12:20:27Z
dc.date.available2021-06-03T12:20:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.tum.ac.ke/handle/123456789/17399
dc.description.abstractIn sub-Saharan Africa, malaria is frequently over diagnosed as the cause of an undifferentiated febrile illness, whereas arboviral illnesses are presumed to be underdiagnosed. Sera from 385 febrile Kenyan children, who presented to 1 of 4 clinical sites, were tested using microscopy and real-time molecular assays for dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), malaria, and Leptospira. Malaria was the primary clinical diagnosis for 254 patients, and an arboviral infection (DENV or CHIKV) was the pri mary diagnosis for 93 patients. In total, 158 patients (41.0%) had malaria and 32 patients (8.3%) had CHIKV infections. Compared with real-time polymerase chain reaction, microscopy demonstrated a percent positive agreement of 49.7%. The percentage of malaria cases detected by microscopy varied significantly between clinical sites. Arboviral infections were the clinical diagnosis for patients on the Indian Ocean coast (91 of 238, 38.2%) significantly more often than patients in the Lake Victoria region (2 of 145, 1.4%; P < .001). However, detection of CHIKV infections was significantly higher in the Lake Victoria region (19 of 145 [13.1%] vs 13 of 239 [5.4%]; P = .012). The clinical diagnosis of patients with an acute febrile illness, even when aided by microscopy, remains inaccurate in malaria-endemic areas, contributing to inappropriate management decisions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.subjectChikungunyaen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectMolecular diagnosisen_US
dc.subjectSerumen_US
dc.titleMalaria and Chikungunya Detected Using Molecular Diagnostics Among Febrile Kenyan Childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record