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dc.contributor.authorGrossi-Soyster, Elysse N
dc.contributor.authorBanda, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorTeng, Crystal Y
dc.contributor.authorMuchiri, Eric M
dc.contributor.authorMungai, Peter L
dc.contributor.authorMutuku, Francis M
dc.contributor.authorGildengorin, Ginny
dc.contributor.authorKitron, Uriel
dc.contributor.authorKing, Charles H
dc.contributor.authorLabeaud, A. Desiree
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-04T10:40:29Z
dc.date.available2021-06-04T10:40:29Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.tum.ac.ke/handle/123456789/17405
dc.description.abstractRift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes severe disease in both animals and humans, resulting in significant economic and public health damages. The objective of this study was to measure RVFV seroprevalence in six coastal Kenyan villages between 2009 and 2011, and characterize individual-, household-, and community-level risk factors for prior RVFV exposure. Sera were tested for anti-RVFV IgG via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, 51 (1.8%; confidence interval [CI95] 1.3–2.3) of 2,871 samples were seropositive for RVFV. Seroprevalence differed significantly among villages, and was highest in Jego Village (18/300; 6.0%; CI95 3.6–9.3) and lowest in Magodzoni (0/248). Adults were more likely to be seropositive than children (P < 0.001). Seropositive subjects were less likely to own land or a motor vehicle (P < 0.01), suggesting exposure is associated with lower socioeconomic standing (P = 0.03). RVFV exposure appears to be low in coastal Kenya, although with some variability among villages.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_US
dc.subjectRift Valley Feveren_US
dc.subjectSeroprevalenceen_US
dc.subjectCoastal Kenyaen_US
dc.titleRift Valley Fever Seroprevalence in Coastal Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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