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dc.contributor.authorMiller-Fellows, Sarah C
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Laura
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Rebekah
dc.contributor.authorHildebrand, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorFurin, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorMutuku, Francis M
dc.contributor.authorMukoko, Dunstan
dc.contributor.authorIvy, Julianne A
dc.contributor.authorKing, Charles H
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T07:43:58Z
dc.date.available2021-06-10T07:43:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.tum.ac.ke/handle/123456789/17430
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has documented an increased risk of subfertility in areas of sub-Saharan Africa, as well as an ecological association between urogenital schistosomiasis prevalence and decreased fertility. This pilot project examined reproductive patterns and the potential effects of childhood urogenital Schistosoma haematobium infection and individual treatment experience on adult subfertility among women who were long-term residents in an S. haematobium-endemic region of coastal Kenya. We analyzed findings from 162 in-depth interviews with women of childbearing age in a rural, coastal community, linking them, if possible, to their individual treatment records from previous multi-year longitudinal studies of parasitic infections. Reproductive histo ries indicated a much local higher local rate of subfertility (44%) than worldwide aver ages (8–12%). Although, due to the very high regional prevalence of schistosomiasis, a clear relationship could not be demonstrated between a history of S. haematobium infection and adult subfertility, among a convenience sub-sample of 61 women who had received documented treatment during previous interventional trials, a significant association was found between age at first anti-schistosomal treatment and later fertility in adulthood, with those women treated before age 21 significantly less likely to have subfertility (P = 0.001) he high subfertility rate documented in this pilot study suggests the importance of programs to prevent and treat pelvic infections in their early stages to preclude reproductive tract damage. The available documented treatment data also suggest that early anti-schistosomal treatment may prevent the fertility-damaging effects of urogenital schistosomiasis, and lend support for programs that provide universal treatment of children in S. haematobium-endemic regionsen_US
dc.publisherPLOS neglected tropical diseasesen_US
dc.subjectcross-sectionalen_US
dc.subjectcoastalen_US
dc.subjecttreatmenten_US
dc.subjectSchistosoma haematobiumen_US
dc.titleCross-sectional interview study of fertility, pregnancy, and urogenital schistosomiasis in coastal Kenya: Documented treatment in childhood is associated with reduced odds of subfertility among adult womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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